Korea 2008 Day Four: Korean Folk Village

by Kara on October 11, 2008

A Korean wedding dress is composed of a short jacket with long sleeves called a jeogori and a full length skirt called a chima.

A Korean wedding dress is composed of a short jacket with long sleeves called a jeogori and a full length skirt called a chima.

Today we went to the Korean Folk Village outside of Suwon, which was pretty interesting, but a pain in the rear end to get to. One of the things you can do at the Village is see a traditional Korean wedding ceremony. Usually they have actors, but on occasion, there is a real wedding. Today it was a real wedding, but the bride was Chinese and the groom was Japanese. We thought maybe they had their real wedding elsewhere, and then did this because they were fans of Korean drama, which is huge in China and Japan. The reason the bride in this photo has her friends holding her elbows is because it is very difficult to perform the bows required for the wedding without assistance. It was fun to get to see, as I have not been to a traditional Korean wedding. We did not have any Korean elements at our wedding, other than serving tteok at the reception.

These women are preparing haemul pajeon, Korean pancakes filled green onions and seafood.

These women are preparing haemul pajeon, Korean pancakes filled green onions and seafood.

At the food court, you had to go buy meal tickets for exactly what you want (or in my case, what I am told I want), sight unseen. Then each menu item is printed on a receipt with a number and you stand in numbered lines according to what you ordered, so it helps to have a group of people if you want a few different things. Stephen got stuck in the pa jeon (Korean pancake) line behind someone who ordered TWENTY, but of course he made good use of the time by photographing the staff making the pa jeon.

Stephen’s Dad bought us some snacks during the day too. MANY Korean foods, both savory and sweet, are made from rice. We had sticky rice taffy, which is only slightly sweet, as Koreans like things a little less sweet than Americans. We also had some other rice confection, which had the consistency of cotton candy on the inside and an outer layer rolled in chopped up sesame seeds. I did NOT want to try it, but I did and they were totally addicting.

This Korean woman weaving cloth from cotton yarn on a loom.

This Korean woman weaving cloth from cotton yarn on a loom.

When we got home that evening, we had a red bean and rice porridge. The porridge had big balls of glutinous rice in it. Stephen’s Dad said you were supposed to eat the same number as your age on some holiday (I think it was New Year’s), but he said he could not eat 73 of them. They are good, but I don’t think I could even eat 40 of them.

Check out more of Stephen’s pictures of South Korea.

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